Tag: Prix

Abordabilité

Environmental Commissioner of Ontario: Promoting Electricity Pricing Literacy (Part 1 of 3)

A February 22nd blog post made by the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario adds perspective to prices that are paid for electricity generated from renewable resources. (suite…)

Abordabilité

Investing in renewable energy today is likely to save ratepayers money within the next 15 years: author of new report explains results

Ontario’s electricity prices have become a hot-button issue recently. But in spite of the increased focus on Ontario’s electricity system, and in particular the Green Energy Act, there has been little information about how replacing the Act would affect electricity prices in the future.

(suite…)

Abordabilité

Let’s get the facts straight, wind power is a change for the better – by Adam Scott

It means cleaner air, thousands of new jobs and opportunities for communities, a smarter way to make electricity and a legacy worth leaving for our kids. Wind power is also an excellent way to prevent further global warming by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions we produce when making electricity.  Windmills are allowing us to shut down our massively polluting coal-fired power plants, the largest sources of CO2, air pollution and toxins in the province.

Renewable Energy isn’t responsible for rising electricity rates.  The independent Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, Gord Miller, recently showed that all renewable energy and conservation combined represent only a measly 3 per cent of electricity bills. Ontario has to replace an aging electricity system, we have no choice about that, but we do have a choice to build clean, safe and local generation this time around.   Under the FIT program, wind producers only get paid a maximum of 13.5 cent per kWh – period.  That’s likely less than the all-in cost of nuclear when all the tax subsidized stranded debt, nuclear waste disposal and safety concerns are considered.       Under the Green Energy Act, wind and solar producers only get paid for actual electricity they generate – so ratepayers are never on the hook for the huge construction, maintenance, fuel costs, and downtime associated with dirty old electricity plants.  If the windmill doesn’t generate – we don’t pay. Renewable energy is also a huge boost to jobs in Ontario. The Green Energy Act requires that 50 per cent of windmill projects and 60 per cent of solar projects must be Ontario content. This has sparked a whole new green energy industry that is creating new jobs across the province. For example windmill blades will be built in Tillsonburg, solar panels are being made in Guelph, and in small communities everywhere local trades and businesses are finding new work.   When we take a breath, learn the facts and think it through, the future looks cleaner, safer and more prosperous with renewable energy. Adam Scott

Abordabilité

The True Cost of Renewable Energy and Conservation

A blog post made by the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario puts the true cost of renewable energy and conservation in perspective – the cost of conservation and all the renewable subsidies in 2010 amounted to 0.4 cents of the 13 cents we paid for a kWh in our homes.

(suite…)